The question of ‘why do I need a website’ came up this week when I was at the Business Design Centre for the ‘Make it British’ Event.

This annual event gathers everyone involved in the making of clothes and homewares, from yarn and cloth manufacturers, machines to sew it all together, labels and packaging, sample production, factories that will sew it all together and everything in between that a fashion designer might need to help them bring their fashion ideas into market.

I got chatting to one fabric manufacturer. The owner had decided that he didn’t need a website, even though they had now been in business for just over 2 years and were growing well, supplying large organisations like Asda.

Photo by Ethan Bodnar on Unsplash

Why do I need a website?

He explained to me that he didn’t want a website as he felt that he would then be inundated with even more useless enquiries from people who just weren’t his customer.

He said he was already wasting too much time seeing designers who were only interested in buying small lengths to make up samples, when his business is geared to sell thousands of meters to big scale clothing manufacturers, so why would he want to encourage more enquiries of the wrong sorts?

Why indeed!

Why would I need or want a website if all it would do was to attract sales enquiries from people who just aren’t your customer! It wastes everyone’s time!

Why you do need a website!

But if people knew before contacting you what you did and who you served because they got that information from your website, they wouldn’t bother making the enquiry in the first place, thereby the only time waste was theirs checking out your website, not yours dealing with them to discover that!

What he hadn’t appreciated was that having a website would be a no-brainer way of filtering enquiries, so he only dealt with suitable potential clients – large-scale clothing manufacturers.

With a website, he could clearly explain who his ideal client was and the quantities they need to order from him and what kinds of fabric they manufacturer.

That would stop the wrong sorts of enquiries from designers only wanting a few meters for their sample range and now everyone is happy. The designer hasn’t wasted more than a few seconds on his website and he’s only dealing with people who can make those kind of orders.

For example, their website could say in the headline they supply national chains 1000m of knitted fabric then those are the sales enquiries they will get. A far better use of everyone’s time.

Same applies to any kind of business, small or large, whether it’s products or services. If you’re clear about who you serve and what you do for them, then you’ll get enquiries from relevant potential customers who fit that description.

A Website Can Attract the Right Types of Enquiries

I’ve now convinced him that having a website will attract the right enquiries and save a heap of time and effort wasted meeting unsuitable prospects, so he’s making his website a priority now J

What next

But what if you haven’t got thousands to pay a web builder to make a site for you, then your best option is to DIY, but where to start?

I’m updating my Biz Website Course which is suitable for anyone who wants to build a WordPress website for their business and they aren’t technical. It’s an online course where it’s like you’re sitting on my shoulder watching and copying what I do.

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