The Truth about the Boost Post Button (in Facebook)

If you have a business page set up in Facebook, then you’ll have noticed Facebook encourages you to hit the Boost Post button. This article is about what boosting posts actually is, why you SHOULDN’T boost posts and what you should do instead.

It’s a question I am often asked. ‘Other people are telling me they’re getting good results from their boosted posts. Should I be boosting posts too?’.

My answer is no.

Why?

Because when you boost a post, there’s no meaningful purpose to it, other than placing your post in front of many more eyes. Yes, it is possible to target a certain audience based on their age, gender, location and interests and yes, the boosted post will have been placed in front of thousands of them and Facebook will report that your boosted post cost £13 and ‘reached’ 4,300 or so people. That is a result. And you might think that was a good result if normally your posts don’t reach more than 10-50 people.

But so what? What’s the point of ‘reaching’ thousands more people if they took no action and are no nearer to becoming a lead (never mind a paying customer)? What is for sure, it’s a good way to leak a lot of money for no return, and why would you do that!

The better option is to spend the same money that you would waste boosting posts and turn your post into a Facebook ad.

What’s the difference?

With a Facebook ad, you can place your post in front of people who are more likely to take action, because Facebook tracks and ‘learns’ who is taking action having seen your post, and then places your post in front of more people with a matching profile, which means your post as a Facebook ad will have much better results than as a boosted post.

One way Facebook does this is through a bit of code called a pixel which is placed in the code of your website. You can’t see the code, but Facebook can.

This pixel is very clever, as it allows Facebook to track who is visiting your website and allows you to create segments of your audience i.e. people who are on Facebook and who visited pages in your website.

This means you can be very targeted with the audiences your posts (or ads) get placed infront of. So an ad you do for ‘cold traffic’ takes into account that they don’t know you at all, so your ad would be about offering free information.

Whereas an ad you do for ‘warm traffic’ are people who do know you (because they’ve visited your website), so your ad could be more driven to get them to sign up to something free or low cost.

And then you might also have an audience of ‘hot traffic’ because they’ve bought from you already, so an ad for them could be quite different from a cold ad and be more sales driven than warm traffic.

What doesn’t work

People are (rightly) less trusting of what they find on the internet and I’ve noticed this is particularly true of the Facebook ad campaigns I’ve been doing for clients. Ads to a cold audience, prompting them to ‘call for a free consultation’ don’t work nearly as well as ‘click here to download a freebie’.

They’re not ready to speak at that early stage, but they are ready to receive a freebie and if it’s interesting enough and solves an immediate pain they’re experiencing, they will divulge their email address to get it.

And once you have their email in your system you can start nurturing the relationship further with follow up emails and targeted ads, so that eventually they’ve got to know like and trust you enough and feel that you are indeed the only person who can solve their problem and they’ll pay you for your service to fix their problem.

It therefore follows that you need website and lead gathering system to collect and nurture leads. Or else all the money spent of Facebook ads is a complete waste of money. I have a free guide for that here.

So there you have a quick overview of what boost post means, why not to boost post on Facebook, and why it’s better to set posts up as Facebook ads.

Remember to get the free guide here.

 

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